Sunday, October 28, 2012

Computers and Eyesight

More and more jobs require the use of computers. With the information age being available on the computer, more and more people are spending endless hours in front of the screen. After a long day in front of the computer, it is common to start feeling tired, irritable, or pain in the eyes or head. Staring at computers and forgetting to relax and give the eyes a break can cause permanent damage and eye problems.

No one is expected to live a life without computers; we all need them and are use to them being a part of our daily lives. However, it is important to listen to our bodies and relax or take a break when necessary.

Listen to your body; it knows better than you do when it’s time for a break. Do not work until your eyes burn; you missed all the previous signs. Take short breaks every hour of work. This means get at least once every hour and walk around. However, taking breaks isn’t enough. Look away from the screen every 15-20 minutes for a minute or two. Look at things close and far away to allow the eyes to adjust and move around. The goal is to avoid the strain in the first place.

Blink as often as you can to keep the eyes lubricated. Take a few minutes to roll the eyeballs around; you can do this with your eyes open or closed to avoid looking silly. Open and close your eyes often to give them a short break. Yawn if you have too. Yawning stretches out the jaw muscles and keeps them from becoming tense causing headaches and eyes strain.

Move around as much as possible. You should always be in a comfortable position so adjust your body or chair as often as needed. Move the keyboard or monitor so you aren’t stretching your neck or looking at things at a strange angle. Try to avoid glare on the monitor, move it around as the sun moves or get a screen protector.

Keep the work area bright and well lit. Bright lights lighten up the mood and keep you feeling positive. Dim lights only bring down your mood and cause you to feel sluggish. Making minor changes in the work space and taking breaks often can keep long hours in front of the computer from permanently damaging the eyes.

Monday, October 22, 2012

Better Vision for Greater Memory

To keep the memory sharp, it is important to maintain vision. Relaxation is the key to maintain vision for many years. Vision and mental focus go hand in hand and both don’t do well with strain and stress. Relaxation and inner peace is important in remembering things. All these things rely on each other to work properly.

A great way to test the condition of the eyes is a mental memory exercise. In this exercise, the goal is to maintain a visual image for as long as possible. To start, cover one eye and glance quickly at a letter on the page with the other eye. Close your eyes and hold the image of the letter in your mind as long as possible. Count how many seconds the image stays in your mind before fading away to darkness. Take note of this number. Do the same thing for the other eye and compare the results.

Now relax the eyes and try again. One way to relax the eyes is to close them and concentrate only on pleasant thoughts and good memories. Allow your eyes to focus on the darkness and forget everything around you. Open your eyes and try the exercise again. Hopefully the results are different and the image stayed longer the second time around. If not, you may need to find some eye relaxing exercises and work on removing the strain.

Vision affects memory. We need the vision to see the image. The more clearly we see the image the more detail we can recall on later. Focusing on the positive events will help keep the mind relaxed and the eyes free of strain.

The following exercise will help you relax and improve your memory. Try it tonight. While lying in bed tonight focus on all the positive things that happened throughout the day. Picture the events of the in as much detail and color as possible. Try picturing your lunch or the clothes the person who complimented you was wearing. Focusing on the positive will clear your mind, relax the body, and give you a better night’s sleep.

Removing the strain from the eyes will not only improve your vision it will also improve your memory.

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Are Your Glasses Actually Hurting Your Eyes?

Almost half the population in America wears some sort of artificial lens, glasses or contact lenses. Artificial lenses may help improve your vision, but it is just a temporary fix. Glasses and lenses can never fix your eye problems. Artificial lenses can help you see things more clearly, but they are mainly for the symptoms of eye problems and do not cure the actual ailment.

The main problem with artificial lenses is they teach you bad habits and allow your eyes to work incorrectly. You quickly become dependent on the lenses and keep your eyes from healing themselves. If you can teach your eyes to be more relaxed, the need for glasses and lenses would go away completely.

The main cause of most eye ailments is mental stress and strain on the eyes. The key is to learn how to avoid strain in the first place. That is not always possible, so learning new habits to deal with strain is the next step.

One of the largest problems with artificial lenses is finding the perfect prescription. Your eyes are constantly changing. Many things play a factor in how well you can see. Weather, health, mood, distractions, and outside stressors all play a part in your vision. When it’s sunny and bright out our moods are usually better and so is our eyesight. For a doctor to find the perfect prescription is impossible. You may go to the doctor when you are in a bad mood and its dark and rainy out. Your prescription will reflect this making them not work at all when you are happy and it’s bright out.

Try going without your glasses for a few weeks and see what happens. You may be surprised at the results. Of course at first things may be blurry, but once your eyes start to adjust to a life without artificial lenses things will become clearer. The trick is to make sure you are free of too much mental strain. Try some relaxation techniques and rest your eyes when things start to get out of focus.

Wearing artificial lenses can make our eyes lazy and teach us many bad habits. Concentrate on fixing the problem of mental strain and don’t just cover up the problem.

Friday, October 5, 2012

The Dangers of a Lie


Everyone has told a lie once or twice. A lie is anything that isn’t the truth. Taking away a few pounds on your driver’s license, allowing people to believe you are a few years younger, or keeping the whole truth for someone are all lies. White lies may make us feel better and keep us from hurting others, but the damage is all in the eyes.

Lying hurts and damages the eyes no matter how small the lie may be. Lying puts strain on the eyes and keeps them from properly working. For one, you have to make up the lie and then remember all the details so you don’t get caught. This extra concentration and strain on the eyes causes damage.

A retinoscope is what the trained professionals use to see who is lying to them. The retinoscope works better than a polygraph test because the eyes don’t lie, even if you do. The retinoscope tests for refraction, the eyes’ ability to focus on light. A lie changes how the eyes see and how they react to light.

Someone who lies on a daily basis may actually start to believe their own lies, but the mind still knows the truth. The mind also has a funny way of deciphering its own reality, especially if you have trained yourself to believe your lies. Now, you may start to hear things you want to hear twisting the truth to fit your own reality. Hearing what you want can cause some serious problems and some major arguments.

Strain on the eyes can cause you to lose focus and concentration. Your conversations with other people won’t go well because you will be unable to hear what they are really saying. Arguments will be difficult because your mind is unable to handle the truth or it can’t take in anything negative.

If you are feeling strain and misinterpreting what other’s our saying, it’s time to step back and regain the focus. Take a few minutes to relax and get your natural thought process back to normal. If you are strained, you are not giving enough in the conversation and it will seem one sided to the other person. Step back, relax, and then rejoin the conversation when you can actually give yourself fully and truthfully.
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